Educational Courses

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Please note that if you are taking both BRAIN Educational Course and BRAIN PET Educational Course, you are required to register both courses.

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BRAIN Educational Courses

Last update: June 26, 2019
(This is subject to change.)
BC01:
Latest advances in stroke models
Chairs: Sunghee Cho and Stuart Allan
Speakers:
Tim Murphy
Tim Murphy
(Canada)
Optical access to brain circuit in awake mice for stroke induction and assessment

Biography

Tim Murphy
Tim Murphy Tim Murphy’s lab is developing new in vivo imaging and optogenetic tools that have parallels to human brain imaging and stimulation tools. They are developing automated methods of mouse brain imaging using home-cage technologies that enable remote control of experiments through the internet. The lab evaluates mesoscale functional connectivity using genetically-encoded activity sensors with the aim of piloting treatments for circuit-level activity imbalances that accompany diseases of the nervous system such as stroke. These tools enable 24 h/day monitoring of sensory-motor function in mouse home cages. High-through mouse assessment but also light activated stroke models are being developed.
Mustafa Balkaya
Mustafa Balkaya
(USA)
Stroke recovery model in mice with MCAO: longitudinal behavior analyses across post-stroke stages

Biography

Mustafa Balkaya
Mustafa Balkaya Mustafa Balkaya received his B.A in Medical Biology from Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty in 2003. He then moved to Berlin, where he completed his MSc degree in Medical neurosciences at Charité Medical School (2006) during which he received the Charité student research award. He completed his PhD work under the supervision of Prof. Mathias Endres. His work focused on establishing sensory-motor behavior tests to evaluate long-term stroke outcome and recovery and investigating the bidirectional interaction between stress and stroke and the pathophysiology of post-stroke depression. Subsequently, he worked as a research associate and postdoctoral fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital / Harvard Medical School under the supervision of Prof. Cenk Ayata and investigated the role of stress as a migraine trigger (2012). He later received the title Assistant Professor of Physiology from Bahcesehir University Medical Faculty – Istanbul (2014). In 2016 he moved to Burke Medical Research institute, where he is currently working as a postdoctoral research fellow under the supervision of Prof. Sunghee Cho. His current research interests include the role of CD36 in long-term stroke recovery and BDNF polymorphisms in post-stroke depression pathophysiology.
Woo-Ping Ge
Woo-Ping Ge
(USA)
Control of cerebral ischemia with magnetic nanoparticles: Magnetic bead occlusion model

Biography

Woo-Ping Ge
Woo-Ping Ge
We developed a technology that uses micromagnets to induce aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles to reversibly occlude blood flow in microvessels. This allowed induction of ischemia in a specific cortical region of conscious mice of any postnatal age, including perinatal and neonatal stages, with precise spatiotemporal control but without surgical intervention of the skull or artery.

A Personal Statement

My research has broad interests in glial function and glial cell generation in the brain (Ge et al., Science, 2006, Ge et al., Nature, 2012) and the development of brain vasculature. After establishing my laboratory at UT Southwestern, we devote a lot of our effort in the establishment of new approaches/tools to study brain repair after ischemia (Jia et al., 2017, Nature Methods; Jia et al., 2018, Mol. Brain).

Positions, Employment

2013.09–present Assistant Professor, Children’s Research Institute, Pediatrics & Neuroscience, Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

Honors-Awards

2007 China's Top 10 Advances in Basic Research in 2006
2011 NINDS Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00)
2017 The Dan Adams "Thinking Outside the Box" Award
(The Henrietta B. and Frederick H. Bugher Foundation)

Selected publications

  1. 1. Jia JM, Chowdary PD, Gao X, Ci B, Li W, Mulgaonkar A, Plautz EJ, Hassan G, Kumar A, Stowe AM, Yang SH, Zhou W, Sun X, Cui B*, Ge WP* (2017) Control of cerebral ischemia with magnetic nanoparticles. Nat Methods. (2017);14(2):160-166. PMCID: PMC5792654
  2. 2. Jing D, Zhang S, Luo W, Gao X, Men Y, Ma C, Liu X, Yi Y, Bugde A, Zhou B, Zhao Z, Yuan Q, Feng JQ, Ge WP, Zhao H. Whole body clearing and imaging with PEG Associated Solvent System (PEGASOS) (Cell Research, June 2018, online).
  3. 3. Jia JM, Peng C, Wang Y, Zheng J, Ge WP (2018) Control of occlusion of middle cerebral artery in perinatal and neonatal mice with magnetic force. Mol Brain. (2018) 11(1):47.
  4. 4. Ge WP, Miyawaki A, Gage FH, Jan YN, Jan LY. Local generation of glia is a major astrocyte source in postnatal cortex. Nature 484, 376-380 (2012) [PMCID: PMC3777276]
  5. 5. Ge WP*, Yang XJ*, Zhang Z, Wang HK, Shen W, Deng QD, Duan S. Long-term potentiation of neuron-glia synapses mediated by Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors. Science. 312(5779):1533-1537 (2006) ( *- co-first author).
Karen Horsburgh
Karen Horsburgh
(Scotland, UK)
Chronic hypoperfusion model for white matter injury and cognitive dysfunction

Biography

Karen Horsburgh
Karen Horsburgh

Karen received a BSc in Pharmacology and a PhD in Neuroscience (focusing on signaling mechanisms in Alzheimer’s disease) at the University of Glasgow. She initially studied as a post-doctoral researcher at an Alzheimer’s Disease Institute (Dept. of Neuroscience, University of California, San Diego) and then returned to the University of Glasgow where she was awarded a SHERT/Mrs Jean Baxter Research Fellowship. She continued her research in dementia and received a Wellcome Trust University Award (2002) to establish her research group at the University of Edinburgh where she currently holds the position of Professor of Neuroscience. She has served on the research panels of Medical Research Scotland, Alzheimer’s Society and Alzheimer’s Research UK. Karen is programme lead of a UK-wide Stroke priority programme (Advancing Care and Treatment of Vascular Dementia) and is lead co-ordinator of an Alzheimer’s Society doctoral training programme. She is currently a member of the MRC Dementia Platform UK Vascular Experimental Medicine committee and Alzheimer’s Society strategy committee.

Her research is focussed on vascular contributions to cognitive decline and dementia. Experimental models relevant to vascular cognitive impairment are studied using a range of approaches (multiphoton imaging, neuroimaging, behaviour, pathology, transcriptomics/proteomics). Her current research investigates microvascular mechanisms including endothelial cell activation and inflammation in relation to white matter disease progression.
BC02:
Latest developments in understanding neurovascular coupling
Chairs: Jessica Filosa and Edith Hamel
Speakers:
Bruno Cauli
Bruno Cauli
(France)
Neurogenic control of neurovascular coupling

Biography

Bruno Cauli
Bruno Cauli The cerebral cortex comprises diverse areas involved in perception, movement or cognition. In spite of this functional diversity, the cortical network is formed with the repetition of a microcircuit. This microcircuit contains excitatory and inhibitory neuronal types. The neuronal activity of this microcircuit, its local cerebral blood flow and metabolism are tightly coupled to match the increased energy needs occurring during neuronal processing. This neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling, essential to normal brain function and integrity, is also the physiological basis of the hemodynamic contrasts widely used to map neuronal activity in health and disease. A major goal of Bruno Cauli's laboratory is to understand how the microcircuit controls its own energy supply and metabolism via interactions with the glio-vascular network. These points are addressed at the molecular, cellular and network levels in rodent cortical slices. Patch-clamp electrophysiology often combined with single cell RT-PCR and histochemistry is the central methodology of the lab. Viral transfer or transgenic mice are also used to express various genes of interest in cell types. Among these genes, the light-operated channelrhodopsin are used to excite specific neuronal types and evaluate their influence on the glio-vascular network. Diverse bioluminescent or fluorescent genetically-encoded sensors are also to image metabolic activities at the cellular and multicellular levels.
Grant Gordon
Grant Gordon
(Canada)
Tonic and augmenting control of cerebral blood flow by astrocytes

Biography

Grant Gordon
Grant Gordon My lab studies the relationship between neurons, astrocytes and microvasculature in the neocortex and the links between brain cell activity and the delivery of energy substrates via the blood in health and models of disease. Our guiding hypothesis is that astrocytes are an essential hub integrating signals from both neurons and the microvasculature in order to appropriate fuel the brain’s high energy demand. To test our hypothesis, we use two-photon fluorescence imaging, electrophysiology and opto/chemogenetics in acutely isolated brain slices or in fully awake mice in vivo.
Catherine Hall
Catherine Hall
(UK)
Role of vascular mural cells in NVC

Biography

Catherine Hall
Catherine Hall My research has encompassed the fields of biochemical, cellular and systems neuroscience, and has largely focussed on how the brain uses and is supplied with energy. After an undergraduate degree in Physiology with Psychology at the University of Oxford, I moved to University College London, where my PhD studied mechanisms and kinetics of nitric oxide consumption by brain tissue, under the supervision of John Garthwaite. On moving to David Attwell’s lab, also at UCL, I extended this work to quantify how much oxygen is consumed by different neuronal processes, and how and when nitric oxide interferes with brain oxygen consumption. I then began to study how the brain is supplied with oxygen, showing that capillary pericytes are key regulators of neurovascular coupling in brain slices and in vivo, but that these cells are also highly sensitive to damage during disease. I started my own lab in 2014 at the University of Sussex, where I am a Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor). My lab uses 2-photon imaging and haemoglobin spectroscopy to measure neuronal activity and vascular responses in awake behaving mice, as well as studies of brain slices, to measure neurovascular coupling in the cortex and hippocampus in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Our work suggests that neurovascular coupling is affected by brain region (hippocampus vs. cortex) and mild pathophysiological states (APOE4 expression, high fat diet). We hypothesise that these impairments in neurovascular coupling cause or contribute to the progression of neuronal damage in conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. Current and upcoming projects are funded the Academy of Medical Sciences and the Wellcome Trust, via a Springboard Award, the Medical Research Council, the Alzheimer’s Society, the Royal Society and a University of Sussex internal award.
Elizabeth Hillman
Elizabeth Hillman
(USA)
The role of the vascular endothelium in neurovascular coupling
– a unifying mechanism?

Biography

Elizabeth Hillman
Elizabeth Hillman Elizabeth Hillman is a Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Radiology at Columbia University, and a member of the Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute and Kavli Institute for Brain Science. She received undergraduate and graduate degrees in Physics and Medical Physics at University College London and completed post-doctoral training at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital.
Dr Hillman's lab develops novel approaches to in-vivo optical imaging and microscopy for studying living tissues, and applies these tools to studying real-time, brain-wide neural activity, and the relationship between neural activity and blood flow (neurovascular coupling) in the healthy, diseased and developing brain. Her recent awake, behaving mouse brain imaging studies have demonstrated that endothelial cells lining the cerebral vasculature play an important role in neurovascular coupling, propagating vasodilatory signals to amplify and shape the spatiotemporal dynamics of functional hyperemia.
BC03:
Preclinical rehabilitation models
Chairs: Anna Rosell and Ann Stowe
Speakers:
Kate Hayward
Kate Hayward
(Australia)
Clinical perspective of stroke rehabilitation and recovery

Biography

Kate Hayward
Kate Hayward Kate Hayward is a Senior Research Fellow in Stroke Rehabilitation and Recovery at the University of Melbourne, and Research Fellow at the Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health. She currently holds a NHMRC Neil Hamilton Fairley Fellowship. Kate has a triple thread of skills that span physiotherapy (BPhty Hons, James Cook University), rehabilitation sciences (PhD, University of Queensland) and clinical neurosciences (Postdoc, University of British Columbia Canada). Kate's research in the field of stroke rehabilitation is focused on enhancing our understanding of the biological and therapy-induced potential for motor recovery. Using arm and hand function as the experimental model, Kate is leading several research projects to understand "right person, right treatment, right dose, right time".
Miguel Perez-Pinzon
Miguel Perez-Pinzon
(USA)
Post stroke physical exercise

Biography

Miguel Perez-Pinzon
Miguel Perez-Pinzon Dr. Perez-Pinzon is the Peritz Scheinberg Professor of Neurology and Vice-Chair for Basic Science at the Department of Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Dr. Perez-Pinzon directs the Peritz Scheinberg Cerebral Vascular Disease Research Laboratories at the University of Miami. His research is focused on studying brain metabolism in pathological states. Specifically, his research expertise is in the area of cerebral ischemia, which results from cardiac arrest or a stroke. Different directions have emerged from his studies, which encompass the areas of vascular, mitochondrial, synaptic and cognitive dysfunction that ensue following cerebral ischemia. Over the last 21 years, his laboratory has investigated the signaling pathways that lead to neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia following ischemic preconditioning (IPC). He has been studying compounds such as resveratrol (a polyphenol found in red wine) and certain chemicals that activate protein kinase c isoforms to pharmacologically precondition in vivo and in vitro to lessen ischemia-induced neuronal damage. Another area of intensive research in his group is that of mitochondrial dysfunction which ensues following stroke or cardiac arrest. His group has had significant contributions on the signaling pathways that lead to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. Another important area of research by his group is that of the effect of Physical Exercise on cognitive improvements following stroke and cardiac arrest in animal models.
Karsten Ruscher
Karsten Ruscher
(Sweden)
Enriched environment and functional recovery

Biography

Karsten Ruscher
Karsten Ruscher Karsten Ruscher received medical degree from Charité Medical School in 2000. In parallel to his studies he started preclinical research on neuroprotective effects of erythropoietin in stroke models and completed his thesis on this topic at the Department of Experimental Neurology under the supervision of Ulrich Dirnagl and Andreas Meisel in 2003. After a period of clinical residency Dr Ruscher moved to Lund (Sweden) in 2005 where he joined the Laboratory for Experimental Brain Research headed by Professor Tadeusz Wieloch. He changed focus of research towards stroke recovery with particular interest on identification of cellular and molecular mechanisms and drugable targets to enhance recovery of lost neurological functions after stroke. Actual focus of research are mechanisms of poststroke inflammation and neuronal plasticity regulated by dopaminergic signalling. Since 2018 he has been leading stroke research at the Laboratory for Experimental Research at Lund University.
Abigail Kerr
Abigail Kerr
(USA)
Contralesional homotopic plasticity with constraint induced movement therapy

Biography

Abigail Kerr
Abigail Kerr Dr. Abigail Kerr received her Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 2010 under the direction of Dr. Rodney Swain. Following a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Texas at Austin under the direction of Dr. Theresa Jones, Abigail joined the Psychology department at Illinois Wesleyan University. Currently an Associate Professor of Psychology, Abigail is the director of Illinois Wesleyan University's Neuroscience program and maintains an active research program investigating the role of compensatory limb training in functional and structural recovery after stroke in a mouse model.
Ask the clinician:
discussion with Satoshi Hirano (Japan) and Kate Hayward (Australia)

Biography

Satoshi Hirano
Satoshi Hirano

Training

2009 - 2014 Graduate School, School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Japan
2000 - 2004 Gunma University Graduate School & Faculty of Medicine, Japan
1995 - 1997 Waseda University Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Japan
1991 - 1995 Waseda University Faculty of Science and Engineering, Japan

Degrees and Certifications:

2014 Degree of Medical Science (Fujita Health University; No 1054)
2012 Diplomate, Board of the Japanese Association of Rehabilitation Medicine (No 2051)
1997 Master of Engineering (Waseda University; No 88)
1995 Bachelor of Engineering (Waseda University)

Professional Career:

2015 June - present Senior Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine I, School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Japan
2008 Apr - 15 May Junior Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine I, School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Japan
2007 Apr - 08 Mar Department of neurology, Iizuka Hospital, Japan
2004 Apr - 07 Mar Junior and Senior Resident, Iizuka Hospital, Japan
1997 Apr - 00 Mar Researcher, Intelligent Systems Laboratory, SECOM Co., Ltd., Japan
BC04:
How to get started as an independent investigator (ECI)
Chairs: Samuel Knauss and Yongting Wang
Speakers:
Helene Girouard
Helene Girouard
(Canada)
Establishing a lab for the first time - The transition

Biography

Helene Girouard
Helene Girouard
Dr Girouard completed her PhD in cardiovascular physiology in 2002 at the Université de Montreal under the supervision of Dr J. de Champlain, a specialist in the field of hypertension. She then pursued with two fellowships both on the study of cerebrovascular regulation: one at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University and a second one at the University of Vermont under the supervisions of Dr Costantino Iadecola and Dr Mark T. Nelson, respectively. She is now Full professor at the Department of pharmacology and physiology at the Université de Montréal and the director of the laboratory of neurovascular pharmacology since 2008. Along her career, Dr Girouard received prices including the Merck New investigator price of the ‘Société Québécoise d’Hypertension Artérielle’ and the Young Investigator Award from the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. She was nominated Fellow of the American Heart Association. She is involved in many Societies related to Hypertension and neurosciences in particular the ‘Société Québécoise d’Hypertension Artérielle’ and the ‘International Society of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism’ in which she is member of the Board of Directors.
The research interests of Dr Girouard are the study of the mechanisms underlying cerebrovascular regulation in health and diseases especialy in the context of hypertension and arterial stiffness. The main objective of her research is to find therapeutical targets to protect the brain from vascular diseases. To reach this objective, she is using various techniques from molecular biology to brain imaging in mice and humans. She published mostly in the field of hypertension and cerebrovascular regulation.
Creed Stary
Creed Stary
(USA)
Establishing a lab for the first time - Managing your resources

Biography

Creed Stary
Creed Stary Creed is a clinical anesthesiologist and neuroscientist. His research focuses on the molecular regulation of mitochondrial function, and how metabolic and neuronal-glial dysfunction contribute to brain injury after cerebral ischemia. He is a father of three, a former pole-vaulter, and occasionally still finds time to surf.
Fahmeed Hyder
Fahmeed Hyder
(USA)
When I started my first lab / Establishing successful collaborations?

Biography

Fahmeed Hyder
Fahmeed Hyder Professor Hyder studied physical chemistry at Wabash College and biophysical chemistry at Yale University. He develops MR-based imaging to study brain physiology and chemistry, revealing how neuronal-glial cells fuel their function and (re)growth. His work has produced >175 papers with just as many presentations. His lab has had continuous federal support for over two decades.
Thiruma (Garrie) Arumugam
Thiruma (Garrie) Arumugam
(Singapore)
Establishing the lab for the first time

Biography

Thiruma (Garrie) Arumugam
Thiruma (Garrie) Arumugam Thiruma V. Arumugam is an Associate Professor of Neuroscience at the Department of Physiology, YLLSOM, NUS, Singapore. Dr. Arumugam’s major research focuses on unravelling neuronal cell death mechanisms in stroke. Dr. Arumugam’s research into novel targets for stroke therapy has the very real prospect of both transforming the field, as well as providing an intellectual platform for new drug development for stroke therapy. A/Prof Arumugam has over 145 publications and he is a lead, first or senior author on the majority of his publications, which have been collectively cited >11,000 times.
Panel discussion:
Eng Lo, Fahmeed Hyder, Creed Stary, Helene Girouard, Thiruma (Garrie) Arumugam,
Thomas P Davis

BRAIN PET Educational Courses

BP01:
Glucose utilization in neuronal and tumor cells
- novel perspectives for [18F]FDG PET
Chairs: Mikael Palner, Katsuya Yamada
Speakers:
Mikael Palner
Mikael Palner
(Denmark)
Introduction: background and different novel usages of 18F-FDG PET

Biography

Mikael Palner
Mikael Palner Mikael Palner have been involved in preclinical PET for over a decade. Most of the time as part of the Neurobiology Research Unit in Copenhagen with Gitte M Knudsen, where he evaluated many novel tracer compounds for dopamine and serotonergic receptors. He also spend quite some time in US and Canada, at CAMH with Alan Wilson, at Columbia University with Ramin Parsey (now director of PET research at Stony Brook) and at Stanford University with Jianghong Rao and Frederick Chin. His current research focus on novel uses of preclinical PET.
Iben Lundgaard
Iben Lundgaard
(Sweden)
Direct neuronal glucose uptake using 2DG-IR imaging

Biography

Iben Lundgaard
Iben Lundgaard Iben Lundgaard got her PhD in neuroscience from the University of Cambridge in 2012. She did her postdoctoral work at the University of Rochester studying the glia-lymphatic (glymphatic) system, which is a perivascular system for waste removal in the brain. She also studied metabolism in neurons and astrocytes using near-infrared 2-deoxyglucose (2DG-IR) imaging. I 2017 Dr. Lundgaard received a Wallenberg Fellowship and started her own group at Lund University in Sweden, focusing on the glymphatic system.
Oliver Kann
Oliver Kann
(Germany)
Energy metabolism underlying specific neuronal network activity states

Biography

Oliver Kann
Oliver Kann
I will present our current knowledge about the energy metabolism underlying hippocampal gamma oscillations (30-70 Hz) and sharp wave-ripples, which includes suitability of glucose and lactate fuels, oxygen consumption rates and hemodynamic responses.

Short biography:

2010 Professor for General Neurophysiology, University of Heidelberg, Germany
2009 Habilitation and venia legendi for Physiology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin
2004 Principal Investigator, Institute for Neurophysiology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin
2001 Conferral of doctorate (Dr. med.), Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
2000 Research assistant, Institute for Neurophysiology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin
1996 Experimental works, Max-Delbrück-Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin-Buch
1992 Studies of Human Medicine and Philosophy, Philipps-Universität Marburg and FU Berlin
Katsuya Yamada
Katsuya Yamada
(Japan)
Imaging malignant potential by fluorescent glucose uptake

Biography

Katsuya Yamada
Katsuya Yamada Katsuya Yamada is Associate Professor of Physiology at Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan. He received his Ph.D. from Akita University in Physiology (2000) on the uptake of fluorescent derivative of D-glucose through GLUTs in single, living mammalian cells. To visualize putative non-stereoselective uptakes of the fluorescent glucose (Yamada, K. et al, Nat. Protoc. 2007), he developed the first fluorescent derivative of L-glucose (US8986656, US9958450, EP2325327), which was the topic he talked in the Educational Courses in BRAIN 2009 in Chicago. Beyond his expectations, he found in the next year that the fluorescently labeled L-glucose derivatives entered malignant tumor cells specifically thorough a mechanism inhibited by phloretin (EP2703495, EP2905620, US10001487), the present topic he will talk in the BRAIN PET 2019 Educational Course. His research interests include a sensor of hypoxic (or hypoglycemic) conditions in the brain (Yamada, K. et al., Science 2000), neuron-glia-neuron interactions in the basal ganglia (Shibasaki, K. et al., J. Neurochem. 2017), and an early-stage diagnosis of cancer using the fluorescently labeled L-glucose derivatives (Yamada, K. Biol. Pharm. Bull. 41: 1508-1516, 2018). He is the research representative for JST Collaborative Research Based on Industrial Demand (FY2011-2016), JST A-STEP (FY2011-2016), JST Comprehensive Support Programs for Creation of Regional Innovation Science and Technology Incubation Program (FY2008-2010), and the Hirosaki University Institutional Research Grant (FY2012-2014 and FY2016-2018).
Heike Endepols
Heike Endepols
(Germany)
Metabolic functional connectivity: a new application for FDG-PET

Biography

Heike Endepols
Heike Endepols Heike Endepols studied at the Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany, where she obtained her Diploma in biology in 1992. She then joined the group of Prof. Katharina Braun in Magdeburg and worked with organotypic slice cultures of the chicken brain, where she studied synaptic plasticity. She received the degree Dr. rer. nat. (equivalent to Ph.D.) in 1996. She worked on sensorimotor integration in anuran amphibians at the University of Cologne from 1996 to 2006, where she received the habilitation degree Priv.-Doz. in 2005. After a research period at the Max Planck Institute for Neurological Research in Cologne (2006-2013, preclinical stroke investigations) she is now head of the precinical imaging group at the Insitute of Radiochemistry and Experimental Molecular Imaging and the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the University Hospital Cologne. She works on preclinical PET imaging of neurodegenerative diseases.
BP02:
The use of amyloid and tau tracers in Alzheimer research
Chairs: Iwao Kanno, Adriaan Lammertsma
Speakers:
Victor Villemagne
Victor Villemagne
(Australia)
Tau tracers, what do they measure, how can they be used and what are the confounders

Biography

Victor Villemagne
Victor Villemagne
Dr Villemagne graduated Cum Laude in 1983 from the Universidad Nacional de Buenos Aires, Argentina. He was awarded a Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Nuclear Medicine in 1984 and continued his post-graduate studies at the Division of Nuclear Medicine at The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. He subsequently furthered his molecular neuroimaging training at NIDA, NIH, and at the University of Pittsburgh.
Since 2003, when he joined the Neurodegeneration group in Melbourne, he has performed several preclinical and clinical studies of new tracers for Aβ and tau imaging in animal transgenic models and in humans. His research involves national and international collaborations with neuroscientists, chemists, molecular biologists, clinical neurologists, molecular imaging experts, and is regularly invited to present his research at international meetings.
He has authored or co-authored several book chapters and requested reviews on molecular imaging, and more than 275 original research publications. Among other honours, he has received the de Leon Prize in Neuroimaging (Boston, USA, 7/2013), the Christopher Clark Award for the Continuing Advancement in the Field of Human Amyloid Imaging, (Miami, USA, 1/2014), and the Kuhl-Lassen award by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (Philadelphia, USA, 2018). Since 2016, he has been recognized as one of The World's Most Influential Scientific Minds based on his citations being in the top 1% in the world in the field of Neuroscience.
Hitoshi Shimada
Hitoshi Shimada
(Japan)
FDG, amyloid, tau: when to use which tracer

Biography

Hitoshi Shimada
Hitoshi Shimada
Dr. Shimada obtained his M.D. from Chiba University in 2003 and trained in Neurology at Chiba University Hospital and affiliated hospitals. He received Ph.D. degree in Advanced Life Science from Chiba University, Japan, in 2009. He has been the postdoctoral researcher from April 2009, the researcher from December 2009, the senior researcher from July 2014, and the principal researcher from July 2017 of the Department of Functional Brain Imaging Research (DOFI), National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), Chiba, Japan. His current research interests include Molecular Neuroimaging in Neurodegenerative disorders, physiological background of psychiatric symptoms, human perception and cognition, and neuroplasticity. He is Board-Certified in Neurology, Nuclear Medicine, and Dementia. He is a member of the Japanese Society of Neurology, the Japan Society for Dementia Research, the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine, and so on. He is also the member of Amyloid imaging guideline Working Group in Japan.

Honors & Awards

  1. 1. Young Investigator Award, the International College of Geriatric Psychoneuropharmacology (ICGP), 2014
  2. 2. de Leon Prize in Neuroimaging, Alzheimer's Imaging Consortium (AIC), 2014
  3. 3. Travel Scholarship, Human Amyloid Imaging Conference, 2014
  4. 4. Best Poster Award, Alzheimer’s Imaging Consortium, 2013
  5. 5. Young Investigator Encouragement Grant, the 13th Asian Oceanian Congress of Neurology, 2012
and 8 domestic conference awards

Major Publications  *: corresponding author, †: co-first author

  1. 1. Endo H, Shimada H, et al. In Vivo Binding of a Tau Imaging Probe, [11C]PBB3, in Patients With Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. Mov Disord. 2019. (Epub ahead of print)
  2. 2. Ikeda A, Shimada H, et al. Clinical heterogeneity of FTDP-17 caused by MAPT N279K mutation in relation to tau PET features. Mov Disord. 2019. (Epub ahead of print)
  3. 3. Shinotoh H, Shimada H, et al. Tau imaging detects distinctive distribution of tau pathology in ALS/PDC on the Kii Peninsula. Neurology. 2019;92(2):e136-e147.
  4. 4. Kitamura S, Shimada H*, et al. Tau-induced focal neurotoxicity and network disruption related to apathy in Alzheimer's disease. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2018;89(11): 1208-1214.
  5. 5. Shimada H*, et al. Association between Aβ and tau accumulations and their influence on clinical features in aging and Alzheimer's disease spectrum brains: A [(11)C]PBB3-PET study. Alzheimers Dement (Amst). 2016;6:11-20.
  6. 6. Shimada H*, et al. Dementia with Lewy bodies can be well-differentiated from Alzheimer's disease by measurement of brain acetylcholinesterase activity-a [(11)C]MP4A PET study. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2015;30(11):1105-1113.
  7. 7. Maruyama M, Shimada H, et al. Imaging of tau pathology in a tauopathy mouse model and in Alzheimer patients compared to normal controls. Neuron. 2013;79(6):1094-1108.
  8. 8. Shimada H, et al. beta-Amyloid in Lewy body disease is related to Alzheimer's disease-like atrophy. Mov Disord. 2013;28(2): 169-175.
Adriaan Lammertsma
Adriaan Lammertsma
(Netherlands)
How to quantify amyloid and tau PET studies

Biography

Adriaan Lammertsma
Adriaan Lammertsma Prof. Adriaan A. Lammertsma, PhD, has been active in PET research since 1979, when he joined the MRC Cyclotron Unit, Hammersmith Hospital in London. Apart from a sabbatical year at UCLA, Los Angeles, he stayed in London until 1996, when he moved to the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam. Over the years his research focus has been the development and application of tracer kinetic models for quantitative PET studies with applications in neurology, cardiology and oncology. He is the 2012 recipient of the Kuhl-Lassen Award from the Society of Nuclear Medicine and the 2015 recipient of the ESMI Award from the European Society of Molecular Imaging. Adriaan Lammertsma is co-author of more than 500 peer reviewed paper.
Isadora Lopes Alves
Isadora Lopes Alves
(Netherlands)
Why do we need large clinical trials and how should they be designed
– the AMYPAD example

Biography

Isadora Lopes Alves
Isadora Lopes Alves Isadora Lopes Alves is a postdoctoral researcher at the Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Department at VUmc, in Amsterdam. After obtaining her BSc in Medical Physics at PUCRS (Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul) in Brazil, she moved to the Netherlands and obtained her PhD in the topic of PET quantification from the University of Groningen in 2017. Currently, Isadora is one of the lead scientists and project manager for the AMYPAD Consortium (Amyloid Imaging to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease), and jointly leads the project's Disease Modeling team. Her current research focuses on the longitudinal modeling of PET-based amyloid deposition across the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) spectrum, the application of multimodal advanced statistical modeling approaches for determining the natural history of AD, as well as the development of methodological approaches for cross-radiotracer analyses of amyloid burden using PET.

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